Understanding Creative Commons

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by I a Walsh via flickr.com

Creative Commons is a non-profit organization that provides free licenses to you so that you can give others permission to use your work while retaining copyright.

What is copyright?

According to the Canadian Intellectual Property Office:

In the simplest terms, “copyright” means “the right to copy.” In general, copyright means the sole right to produce or reproduce a work or a substantial part of it in any form. It includes the right to perform the work or any substantial part of it or, in the case of a lecture, to deliver it. If the work is unpublished, copyright includes the right to publish the work or any substantial part of it.

How do I know if my work has a copyright?

Copyright exists automatically when an original work or other subject-matter is created, provided the conditions set out in the Copyright Act have been met.

What do I do if someone is using my work without my permission?

If you want to have the legal right to ask someone to take down intellectual property that has been created by you (i.e. artwork, written work, recordings, etc.) you need to register with the Canadian Intellectual Property Office.

So what does a Creative Commons License do?

Creative Commons Licenses are a simple way of retaining copyright while allowing others to reuse your material if they want to. At it’s core, it works on the assumption that other people who want to use your material are moral upstanding citizens who will ask for your permission first. Having a Creative Commons License visible on your page for your work will:

  1. Enable you to set permissions of how others can use your work
  2. Keep your inbox free from clutter cause by having to provide permission to every person who wants to use your work

 How can I get a Creative Commons License?

We’re glad you asked, because it’s actually very simple! Visit this page and answer a few simple questions and it will choose the license that works best for your needs!

 How do I show that I have a Creative Commons License on the material in my ePortfolio?

It’s very simple!

  1. Select your license

Creative Commons License Chooser

In the last box, you’ll see “Have a web page?” This is where you will grab the code to put the Creative Commons License info into your webpage. Select all of the code in the text box (mine is highlighted green in the picture below) and hit ctrl+c or right click and select “copy”

CC COde

Go to the WordPress Dashboard for your ePortfolio and choose the page you want to put the license on. Click “Edit Page”.

Outside of the upper right hand corner on your page editor you will see two tabs that say “Visual” and “Text”. Click on “Text”. This will show you the raw HTML code for your website

Don’t be scared! Scroll to the very last line of text and hit the enter key to begin a new line of text.

 

Paste the code you copied on the creative commons license chooser onto the new line of text.

Hit the “update” button.
Voila! You now have a Creative Commons License on this page of your ePortfolio.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
The images and content on this page were developed and borrowed from the following sites:
Canadian Intellectual Property Office (2015) A Guide to Copyright. Retrieved Oct. 16, 2015.

Sharing your ePortfolio

Review Review Review!

Before you share your ePortfolio with a professor, potential employer, or graduate school you will want to review your ePortfolio for any errors you may have missed while you were developing it. Start by reading through every page and piece of content you uploaded on your ePortfolio to check for any obvious errors such as spelling mistakes, or including personal information such as a personal address or phone number. Following that check for any links that may not be working properly. You can also ask a friend or one of the Learning Innovation Fellows to review your ePortfolio and provide feedback. Below are some resources for reviewing an ePortfolio that you may want to use.


 

Sharing

You’ve spent a ton of time working on your ePortfolio and getting it to polished perfection, now how do you make sure others see it? You can market your ePortfolio a number of ways:

  • Add it to your cover letter or resume
  • Include it in your e-mail signature
  • Share it on your social media
  • Include a link on your LinkedIn page
  • Mention it to employers or when networking
  • Participate in showcase events at TRU hosted by the Centre for Student Engagement and Learning Innovation
  • Use it for submitting projects or assignments
  • Use it to articulate your learning for certificates (i.e. Leadership in Environmental Sustainability or Global Competency)
  • Use it to gain recognition for your learning through the Pathways for Learning Program

Want more ideas? Come visit us in OM 1468!

 

Writing ePortfolio reflections

The “Reflective Writing” Toolkit Presentation

This Workshop will walk you through the fundamentals of reflective writing and its importance in ePortfolio development.

Reflective writing effectively Reflections Slide CaptureIf you would like to attend the next Reflective Writing Toolkit Presentation, the schedule can be found here:

Toolkit Schedule

Creative Commons License
ePortfolio Support TRU by TRU is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Curating content


Artifacts

Artifacts are examples of your work that demonstrate growth. An exemplary ePortfolio would include a wide range of artifacts that are clearly and directly related to the purpose of the ePortfolio. A strong student ePortfolio would include, for example, a PowerPoint presentation from a group project, a paper with the professor’s feedback included, a photo of the student volunteering or working at an event, and/0r a video of the student participating in a work or volunteer experience. Artifacts add depth to an ePortfolio because it provides evidence of learning and growth. Any artifact included on an ePortfolio should be accompanied by a caption explaining the importance of the item as well as a title, author and date to provide context of that artifact to your audience.


Reflections

Reflections are commentary that is written by you to accompany everything on your ePortfolio. Reflections can be used to clearly explain how you have grown, your competencies, accomplishments and your goals for continual development. Reflections can also be used to critique your own work and provide suggestions for personal improvement. You can also use reflections to tie your ePortfolio content together.

Writing about yourself can be tough, that’s why we’ve gathered these helpful reflective prompts to get you started!

General prompts

  1. What skills or abilities did you learn from this experience and how are you able to apply them to other courses and areas of involvement in your life (academic, career, service, campus, personal interests)?
  2. What about this assignment or program was most useful to you? Can you see a relationship to what you’ve learned to your other courses or activities in your academic and/or professional career?
  3. How would you describe this course, project or program to your friends? How would you describe it to a future employer?
  4. What areas and abilities in your life were strengthened or improved by this course, assignment, project or activity?
  5. List the ways you have grown as a result of this assignment, course, project, activity or program.
  6. What problems did you encounter and how did you solve them?
  7. What risks did you take and what did you discover about yourself?
  8. What personal strengths and abilities did you discover and demonstrate by doing this assignment/activity or taking this course?
  9. If you had it to do all over again, would you? Why? What would you change?
  10. How did this experience prepare you for your professional career?

Courtesy of: Nancy Wozniak – Stony Brook University

  1. What did you learn?
  2. Why did you apply for the job? What interested you about that position?
  3. What was a challenge at that job? How did you tackle that challenge?

Reflective Writing

Reflective Writing Help

Writing about yourself can be tough, that’s why we’ve gathered these helpful reflective prompts to get you started!

General prompts

  1. What skills or abilities did you learn from this experience and how are you able to apply them to other courses and areas of involvement in your life (academic, career, service, campus, personal interests)?
  2. What about this assignment or program was most useful to you? Can you see a relationship to what you’ve learned to your other courses or activities in your academic and/or professional career?
  3. How would you describe this course, project or program to your friends? How would you describe it to a future employer?
  4. What areas and abilities in your life were strengthened or improved by this course, assignment, project or activity?
  5. List the ways you have grown as a result of this assignment, course, project, activity or program.
  6. What problems did you encounter and how did you solve them?
  7. What risks did you take and what did you discover about yourself?
  8. What personal strengths and abilities did you discover and demonstrate by doing this assignment/activity or taking this course?
  9. If you had it to do all over again, would you? Why? What would you change?
  10. How did this experience prepare you for your professional career?

Courtesy of: Nancy Wozniak – Stony Brook University

  1. What did you learn?
  2. Why did you apply for the job? What interested you about that position?
  3. What was a challenge at that job? How did you tackle that challenge?